Tag Archives: Black Pudding

An English Breakfast and an Japanese Obon Festival!

Good evening everyone! Today I was quite the foodie and had a delicous adventure. It started this morning when my Father cooked me and my family a traditional English breakfast. Here’s a photo I took before I dug in:

IMG_2174It included English beans in a tomato sauce, toast, English bacon (aka rashers), eggs made to order (I got sunny-side-up because that’s my favorite), black pudding, roasted red tomatoes (not on my plate), pork bangers, and bubble and squeak! (For our recipe to make Bubble and Squeak, see my Food Blog, Tuck In and Chow Down, here!

Later today, I went shopping with my father and found these really good herbal-infused waters:

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To be honest, I got them at Shop Rite for $1.29 each. I tried each one then decided to drink the lemongrass, mint, vanilla one first and save the lavender mint for before bed, since lavender is supposed to be relaxing/calming. The taste of the herbs is subtle and they’re more of an aftertaste than an initial taste, but they’re very good and I highly recommend them!

Later, I went to a Japanese Obon Festival. It was in Seabrook, which is in South Jersey. I carpooled with my friend Kel (not to be confused with Kels, although sometimes I slip up and call her that) and her cousin Sharon.

The festival started around 4p. There was a karate demonstration for a local dojo. I attended an “Introduction to Buddhism” inside the Temple, visited the Zen Garden in the back of the Temple grounds, and watched the Odori Dancing and the Tokai Drumming! I even took videos for you guys! But…I can’t figure out how to upload videos to my WordPress Blog! Sadness! -cries in a corner- I really want to share, too!

Ah…but I also got food while I was there. Since it was a Japanese festival, they served Japanese stall (vendor) food. I had beef and onion stir-fry over white rice:

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And Somen noodles (yum!):

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Somen noodles are a Japense thin-noodle (about 1.33 mm (think angel hair pasta or vercimelli), usually made of wheat. They are served cold and mostly eaten during the summers of Japan as Japanese summers are hot and humid and it is easy to loose your appetite by the end of the day. Somen is served in a soy sauced-based sauce (men-tsuyu) and can be garnished with your choices of grated ginger, chopped green onions, or Katsuobushi (which is dried, fermented, and smoked skipjack tuna).

“Somen is not something you normally eat at restaurants. It is truly home cooking…[an] easy one too!  You can find dried Somen noodle along with noodle sauce at many supermarkets in the US.”     –Japanese Cooking 101

All in all, today was a deliciousness-filled day! Looking forward to more adventures!

Look for my words again soon!

-Soleil

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