Tag Archives: Fun Facts

Cyber Connection

Do you play video games? What kind? RPGs? MMOs? FPS? Etc..

I do. I love video games. I’ve been playing them since…gosh, 1997 or so. My very first system? The handheld Nintendo Gameboy. Not the Gameboy Color, not the Gameboy Pocket, just the original classic Nintendo Gameboy. It was great. Standard gray case, digital green screen, and a square game cartridge. I loved the digital 8-bit music chips and the pixel sprite characters. The best part? Playing was a challenge, not just because of the challenges in the games but because of the challenges outside of the games. Did I have enough battery power left to finish the level? If I didn’t, did we have batteries on-hand that I could replace them before the final boss fight? Was there enough light to see the screen (yes, this was before backlit screens existed)?) It was so fun to try to play by holding up my Gameboy and using the headlights of the cars behind us on the road to play my game on trips.

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After the Gameboy, my next system was the N64 console which my younger brothers and I got for Christmas. Our first game for it was Donkey Kong 64. I still have both and they still work. Our Dad actually restarted his game the other month to play it again. I still love those graphics. The chunky, blockiness of the characters and world you explore and play in. There’s just classic, retro love all around for the whole thing.

From the Gameboy I upgraded to a Gameboy Color, then a Gameboy Micro, then a Gameboy Advanced. I skipped the square DS generation and went straight for the 3DS and now I have a 3DS XL Legend of Zelda gold case edition.

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Along the way, I picked up a PS2 (for DDR and Kingdom Hearts, what else?), a GameCube, Wii, Wii U, and now a Nintendo Switch, an Xbox 360 and now I have an Xbox One S. (PS – I still have all of these systems, ALL of them except my original Gameboy. Someday, I’d love to get a Gameboy again just because it’s not only a part of my childhood but it was what began my love for video games. It’s where it all started!)

Since I was a kid, video games have really progressed and evolved in the last 20 years alone. I can’t wait to see where they keep going (especially as things like VR start to emerge and become more realistically attainable for the common person). I want to continue to play and be engaged, not only by the games I play but with the people I play them with.

What are my top games right now? I’m so glad you asked! Currently it’s the following:

–  PokemonGo on my phone (I literally play this everyday!)]

Pokemon Core Series games (on my 3DS XL and hopefully soon my Nintendo Switch!)

Overwatch on my Xbox One S. (I literally play this game almost every night. Do you play, too? I’m all about Competitive games. If you have a gamertag, let’s play some time! Shoot me a message or comment below!)

ESO on both my computer (through Steam) and on my Xbox One S. Do you play this, too? Let me know and we can quest together!

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Splatoon 2, and Skyrim on my Nintendo Switch.

Those are my top games right now!

Game on, my friends!

– Soleil

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Fun at Home – HGTV

I am an AVID watcher of the television channel HGTV. Growing up in a family where construction was always a constant in my life (my father and his older brother are union electricians and my uncle and Pepere union construction workers), and being an art major, HGTV and all of the aspects of turning one thing into something else in shows like Property Brothers, Love It or List It, and Fixer Upper through not only construction but also through interior design is just SO interesting to me.

I also love to watch House Hunters and especially House Hunters International because of all the cool cultural and architectural features! But, what really makes me laugh with these two shows is when the people looking for a home only look at the negatives of the new houses they’re looking at. One common thing is a lot of people are like “This closet is too small. It won’t even fit all of my bathing suits/shoes/clothes, etc.” A closet can’t fit your bathing suits? You have too many bathing suits, then. I can understand having two or three to switch it up now and then, but how many do you need that they won’t all fit into a closet/take up all of the space in the closet so you don’t have room for your clothes? It’s just silly things like that which I enjoy, haha!

Look for my words again soon!

-Soleil

The History of Downtown Charleston, SC!

I’ve made a liar of myself. I never did make that 9/12 post I promised. For that, I apologize. In case it might happen again:

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So, I wanted to finish up my South Carolina trip recap in this post. Let the fun begin!

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This was my dinner at Jestine’s Kitchen in Downtown Charleseton. It includes some awesome Soul Food: Brown Sugar Glazed Ham, Mac & Cheese, Collard Greens, and cornbread with some real Southern sweet tea.
Trying to get to Jestine’s it started to downpour! Since Ant and I didn’t have an umbrella, we got soaked, of course. It was a cold rain, too.

 

 

 

 

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To the left we have me, soaked, and to the right we have me with my hair dried off and with an awesome flip to it now! Yay!  IMG_7881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also took a really cool historical tour through a portion of Downtown Charleston in an open-carriage pulled by two mules.

St. Philip's Episcopal Church

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

It leans slightly to the left because of the earthquake that happened in the 1800s. Also, John C. Calhoun is buried here. In case you’re wondering, he’s the man who created the “Don’t Tread On Me” flag. Also, Edward Rutledge is buried here, too. He was the youngest signer of the Declaration of Independence and eventually became the 39th Governor of South Carolina.

Powder Magazine

Powder Magazine

The Powder Magazine sat on the edge of the original Charleston city border, which was surrounded by a 17-ft. wall made of mud and palmetto logs. They built a wall around their city because 13 prior attempts to colonize the South (one of which was Roanoke) had failed. The Powder Magazine dates back to 1713 and has walls that are 2-3 feet thick, made of brick, and the roof was stored with sandbags in the case that if there was an explosion, the sound and impact would hopefully be muted. This same wall was very successful during the Revolutionary War. Charleston was able to hold out against the British for four years (compared to Boston and Philadelphia, which fell in under a year), because the wall was built from palmetto logs, which are very absorbent of water and so are very spongey. This sponge-iness allowed for difficulty to surmount and destory and/or invade the city. Since the British couldn’t break the fort walls, they retreated back North. This victory for the city of Charleston is why South Carolina features the Palemetto as its State Tree and on its State Flag.

Charleston had five major fires in its history, and the fire of 1861 wiped out a good portion of the city.

I also learned that in 1704, the Spanish sent several hundred men from St. Augustine, FL to Charleston o wipe out the southermost English colony, which at time was Charleston, SC. The Spanairds attempt failed but the English sent back a retaliation force and burnt St. Augustine to the ground. This allowed English domination in the South.

Then there is King’s Street. It’s the main shopping street of Downtown Charleston. Our tour guide informed us that King’s Street is the highest point in Charleston, at 11-ft. above sea level. Also, it’s named King’s Street because it was owned by the King of England. In fact, it is still owned by Queen Elizabeth II today, so if you live on or do business on King’s Street, you have to pay taxes to the Crown.

Other Fun Facts: Charleston is known as the Holy City because it has so many different churches and was one of the most religously diverse cities of its time in history (in the American Colonies, anyway). In fact, the oldest Synagogue in the country is here and was established back in 1750.

St. John's Lutheran Church

St. John’s Lutheran Church

St. John’s Lutheran Church was established in 1734 and is well-known for it’s great iron-work gates with date back to 1822. They are so signifigant because these gates are one of the few original iron-works in all of Charleston. That’s because during the Civil War, a lot of iron was taken from around the city to melt down into weapons for the war.

The Unitarian Church in Charleston.

The Unitarian Church in Charleston.

The Unitarian Church was made in 1722. (For the record, I took this photo off of Google because my photo wasn’t nearly as good as this). I’ve never heard of Unitarians before this carriage tour. Unitarians believe that everyone goes to Heaven and that there is no Hell. Thomas Jefferson didn’t share their beliefs, so during the Revolutionary War, the Unitarian Church was used as a stable for the soldiers horses.

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These brick homes were built by the US Navy during WWII for soldier housing barracks. After the war, the Navy donated the buildings to the city to be used for whatever they wanted. The city ended up making them public housing.

Extra Fun Fact: All of the bricks used to make these homes, plus all of the old historic buildings in Downtown Charleston were handmade by the slaves on Boone Hall Plantation, which I featured in a previous post.

Old Marine Hospital

Old Marine Hospital

The Old Marine Hospital was designed by Robert Mills. After WWII it became the Jenkins Orphanage. One of the orphans who ended up living here created a dance that caught on and became well-known, even to today. It’s known as the Charleston, and was named after the city it came from.

The Old City Jail

The Old City Jail

Front of the Old City Jail

Front of the Old City Jail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The city of Charleston chose the location of Potter’s Field for the Old City Jail because for the first 150 years of Charleston’s existence, it was the farthest end of the city’s limits. Potter’s Field was settled between Franklin and Archduke Streets and was where the poor and the people of no faith were buried.

Fun Fact: The College of Charleston tried to build a new library not too long ago, about a block away from the prison, and they dug up over 500 bodies. So, the area known as Potter’s Field still had bodies below the homes and streets and old city prison built on top of it.

This being said, I’ve definitely decided that if I EVER moved to Charleston, I would NEVER EVER live in the area known as Potter’s Field.

 

Moving on….

The Memminger Auditorium was once the Charleston high school, but before that it was a middle school. While it was a middle school, cannonballs were dug up on the school grounds, during a renovation project, that dated back to the Civial War! When the cannonballs were found, the bomb squad was called in because during the Civil War, some cannonballs were explosive rounds and they were worried they might still be live.

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The Daughters of Confederacy

The Daughters of Confederacy building hosts many Cival War artifacts, including some of Robert E. Lee’s hair.

Philadelphia Alley

Philadelphia Alley

This is Philadelphia Alley and it is where all of the Gentleman’s Duels took place. John Luke Wilson, a laywer of Charleston, wrote a book of 28 rules for the duels.

Fun Fact: The most common profession for a majority of the duelists were newspaper editors.

Extra Fun Fact: Charleston was once held captive by Blackbeard in the 1800s. His demands were that the townspeople of Charleston give him a chest of medicine in return for him to leave town. They complied. Our tour guide joked that their city is the only one in America who can lay claim to Blackbeard holding their city hostage for healthcare, haha!

Wrapping up, this trip was lots of fun packed into a quick 3-day weekend. If you’re ever heading to Charleston, South Carolina, I highly recommend doing any of the Historic Tours or exhibits. Have fun and look for my words again soon!

Cheers!

-Soleil

What’s In A Puff of Smoke?!

It’s late, but do you know what I just remembered, and just had to share with you guys?!

Ahem, Did You Know:

The term “Pipe Dreams” derives from the 1890s when people would smoke opium and then have hallucinations!

Aw, Basil, don't you know smoking's bad for you?

Aw, Basil, don’t you know smoking’s bad for you?

Nowadays, though, it’s defined as “an unattainable or fanciful hope or scheme” by Google.

Well, I learned that today. I like to learn random tidbits of knowledge like that. I think it’s really interesting!

Okay, goodnight and look for my words again soon!

-Soleil